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to photography classes. >> good evening. so this is the regular meeting of the board of education of san francisco unified school district for september 25, 2012 is now called to order. roll call please. (roll call). >> thank you. >> if you would like to join us for the pledge of allegiance. pledge one and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. okay. i get the first word. giants go. another world series champion. okay. seriously let's get back to the agenda. item a approval of board minutes for the regular minutes of march 13, 2012, august 14, 2012, september 11, 2012. is there a motion for all three? >> [inaudible] >> is there a second. >> second. >> any corrections? roll call please. >> thank you. >> yes. >> ms. (roll call. that is six aye's. >> thank you. presentations to the board of education superintendent report. superintendent carranza your thoughts for the evening. >> great thank you president yee. ladies and gentlemen and all of our parents listening at home. i wish you a good evening. thank you for b
of the most important of the warren court. brown versus the board of education. vo: for years, sacramento politicians have chopped away funds for our schools. today, we're forty-seventh out of fifty in per-pupil funding. now these politicians say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. >>> tonight we are taking a second look at earl warren one of the most popular governors in california history. he was elected to the state's top job three times in 1942, 1946 and 1950. he was so highly regarded that in 1946 he won the republican democratic and independent primaries and was unopposed in the general election. one of warren's major achievements at governor was to reform the prison system. bob mackenzie gives us a look at how two of the oldest california prisons changed at that time. >> reporter: by th
that he and the family provided. his contributions to our education community will be sorely missed, but for the generations to come forward for will provide, continue to provide the kind of education and job skills that we need for our city. over the last few weeks, i have been working closely with the city college to assess their fiscal, managerial, and accreditation issues. i want to thank the people behind me. in particular, the interim chancellor pamela fisher is here, and the current trustees, natalie burke is here today, i need a barrier is also here. thank you very much. also representing our students, mr. walker is here as well. [applause] with any educational institution that has value as our city college, not only did we work with those that are currently involved with them, but we worked as a city family. there is no way to express at this time the need to have this a family together to support our city college. so also i have representatives of the comptroller's office, then rosenfield, mickey callahan, the human resources divisions that are here today, nadia from our p
." michelle rhee is the head of students first, an organization that hopes to reform public education. she, of course, is the former head ofure d.c. schools. former speaker newt gingrich is rejoining us. he does not have a new book out, but his wife calista, does have a new book out, a children's book that will be coming out tomorrow. bob woodward, an associate editor of the "washington post" is the author of "the price of politics" he's written more books than this entire table combined. well, maybe not when you put newt gingrich in there. and pulitzer prize-winning author hendrick smith who has a new book called, "who stole the american dream?" all you people are here to sell books. that's pretty clear. ( laughter ) no, i'm teasing. we're glad to have all of you. mark zandi, let's just talk about what is the state of the american economy right now with just five weeks before we get to this election? the job numbers came out this week on tuesday. we had some very good economic news. housing numbers were up. consumer confidence was up. reports of companies hiring for the holidays seem to
of the worst academic test scores in the country. what do you think should be done to better the educational system? >> i think that is an important question, especially for our economy. i want to point out one thing. she posed for sequestration and now says it will not happen. can you imagine that kind of leadership? she goes for the fiscal cliff and now she says it will not happen. let's talk about education. this is the problem i see. we have a department of education in washington. they have 3500 employees that make over $100,000 a year. they are dictating to the school district how to do their jobs. i think that is a shame and it is wrong. i am not talking about closing down the department of education. i have never said that and never will. can we reduce the size of that department of education and get that money down to the school district? i believe the best education for children in nevada comes between parents, teachers, and principles. -- principals. those are who should be making the decisions. >> if i could quickly comment. my opponent mentioned my vote on sequestration. just a
members. any appointments? commissioner wynn. >>i would like to appoint brian fox to the public education enenrichment committee. >> yes, i have two and -- [inaudible] to the public education enrichment fund. >> any others? okay. seeing none let's move on to the next item. this is the item l, special order of business. i now call the public hearing and adoption of the tentative agreement between the district and the international federation of technical engineers, local 21. is there a motion? >> so moved. >> is there a second? >> second. >> reading of recommendation by superintendent or designee. >> thank you president yee. this say tentative agreement that we reached with local 21 r and extension of the existing collective bargaining agreement and we ask that the board adopt that agreement and the required public disclosure requirements. i want to thank the bargaining teams from local 21. they represent our it work force. >> so there's no public speakers that signed up for this and are there comments from the board or the superintendent? seeing none roll call please. >> thank you
the time needed to build up a great community of people sharing cars. that lets us find great cars, educate the owners, educate the renters, and ensure there is the right balance and variety of cars. if you look on the site in san francisco, you will literally see cars all over the place. it is all over the bay area. you are seeing cars sharing happening in places it never had before. we worked with the city to see if there were any ways we could get out the word. we hope to work with existing programs or be added as an additional transportation solution. in general, we like to involve the city and city leaders in our announcement of coming to market, and it has been working really well. >> i know you have community managers all over the globe. what's going on there? >> airbnb goes to network effects. we are all over in -- we are already in 19 cities all over the world. we just provide the tools on line, and local residents throughout the world decide they want to be part of the movement and part of airbnb and list their homes on the site, and local travelers decide they want to go somewhe
the foundation for individual rights and education. hadley, you were not very political. what happened? >> i have opinions but struggled what i believe, when to speak up, and when to be quiet. john: the because of friends ? >> there were a variety of students that were very mature but others who could be loudmouth that overshadows the culture with a small group to make a lot of noise it can be intimidating. congressmen tom 10 credo was invited but the speech never happened. john: he has positions on immigration that you disagree. i am not in alignment with his philosophy and every issue. tax policy but not by to buy another issues. i was not present the day they shutdown the event but many were shouting there is no debate. no-space 48. that hit home. >> he was shouted down. john: somewhere outside the building and throwing rocks through the window? >> university reacted and condemned the action. unc denounce. but some people did not want to have the debate. some think my views are so illegitimate i should not say them. john: you go to campuses around the country. most illiberal others are silence
or an educator but i think if these kids are hungry i guess my solution would be, eat your mother [bleep] lunch! (laughter) you know whose's not hungry in your old pal remmy counting out in the dumpster. because you gave him your lunch. so the usda which has been setting guidelines for subsidized school lunch force the past, oh, i don't know, 70 years, has, i'm trying to curb what everybody agree says childhood obesity problem changed the last year's school lunch men fru cheese pizza, canned pie nap app-- ian apple, tater tots into whole wheat cheez pizzar, applesauce and low fat milk. oooh. why is this news? >> new guidelines thanks to michelle obama, michelle obama school lunch calorie limits. >> michelle obama nutritional school lunches. >> jon: oh, man, oh, right, that's right. because this isn't really about food or kids. it's about big government uber thanny michelle obama who if she said we feed clean air half the country would demand gills because freedom! listen the complaint. >> the usda shouldn't be deciding how many calories we take or how many calories we expend during the day. at
or form, but when it comes to education, we are not. we are dead last when it comes to education. as the world becomes more technological, 20 years from now, what is america? when you didn't even educate the people to understand the technology we are relying upon? so, you know, if you go to ghettos, i survived and escaped the ghetto, moved my whole family out. people in the ghetto have no clue where we are going technologically. stem is the future. it's what we need to get the 7-year-olds geared upon. get them excited about stem because that's sustainability as well. it's a different type of sustainability, it's educating people to walk into the world where they can contribute and participate in this global community year 2040. >> the common thread throughout the middle east and america is a lot of young people who have had perhaps education they couldn't have had before in many middle eastern countries. they are better educated. there's no job at the end of the line. it creates frustration. so much that you have seen a lot of leaders toppled. i'm sure there's more to come. what
. that's folds. false. they make different choices in education. you see young minute majoring in matt and science. and more young women in gender study and literature. field that are not going pay as well. when they enter the workplace you see more women going in to non-profit and shorter hours and more men in and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason the two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man and woman in the investment bank, they got out of cold man sacks. those should be paid the same. they are paid the same. if there are not there avenues to sue. that's the big difference. >> what dow you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> i think the white house needs to have a counsel on men and boys. because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and women than the single men have lower earnings. you see they are far higher rates of boys cropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. and so if the white house wants to have
of the work is the alignment. i love the idea that early education is talking to kindergarten and they're talking to the larger community and it transfers over. we have step ahead for middle from elementary to middle school and the promise from middle schools to high schools and then all of the community base the organizations that helped to support the out of school time, the summer learning, the after school programming. if we didn't have all of those support mechanisms in place and a lot of the folks that have really dived into the work that we're doing and committed to our work then i don't know if we could actually be tooting our horn the way we are and i want to give a shout out to the community based organizations and frankly have told us these are the things that we need to do, so some have stayed with us in and out and the other thing i want to remind ourselves is that we made some conscious decisions to invest. we not only cut back on things but we also felt strongly about professional development, about making sure that college and career was really important, and we did g
an education, despite no other virtue then we were born here. nobody deserves to be an american. nobody held a contest and said you were okay, you deserve it, you get to be an american. by the grace of god, we are americans. but this little guy was born into one of the worst environments possible, into a country where you will probably starve to death and get cholera and a bunch of other diseases, probably. if not, you might get maimed. so you might have this. okay, i went to bed hungry a few times because i was born to a teenage mother. okay, my life was pretty bad. let me tell you something. nobody cared -- nobody here has had a really bad. this guy has it bad. now he is laying their dying because his right foot is blowing off, his other foot is partially blown off. he had gangrene and he is dying a slow and miserable death. of course, being an american, what we want to do? we want to help the kid. but do i really want to help the kid -- i'm running a safe house. i am in the middle of baghdad territory, i am risking the lives of my agents if i help this young man because that is not my job
is really to educate the commissioners and staff and to start focusing on some sensible ways in which some of these technology glitches can be capped ended. gerri: educate the staff. high-frequency trading has been around for awhile. it seems to me these folks should know everything about it. why don't they? >> i think there is clearly a lag time between when government becomes aware of technological advances and when it starts to understand them fully. i'm not justifying the time frame that has gone on because we have had these problems, as you pointed out, for over two years now. but i think the government is well advised to proceed only when it knows what it is actually doing, rather than just jumping into the freight. gerri: a point. and here's what they will talk about tomorrow, preventing errors in trading car responding to market crises once they have occurred, so it will take this on with people who are inside the industry and people who are critics of the industry. how should they go about either regulating this or changing it or fixing it because you know as well as i do that inv
, but as a non-profit, a charity. in its filing with the irs, alec says its mission is education which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests, i can go down there, and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had that meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important iss
of young people. the legacy of the educational inequality is an economy operating at half power, never getting the qualifications that they could get, never turning the wages that they could earn. the true cost of this cannot be counted in pounds alone. this is a huge drag on the economy, but more than that, this is part of the natural justice and everything that we liberal democrats stand for. if you strip away all of the outer layers, what do you find? the unshakable belief in freedom. not the libertarian freedoms, but the rich sound of liberal freedom, amplified and sustained by the thing that gives the real meaning, opportunity, and the freedom to be who you are. the opportunity, -- [applause] the freedom to be who you are, the opportunity to be who you could be. this is the liberal promise. and that is why this party has always been the party of education. because just as there can be no real freedom without opportunity, there can be no real opportunity without education. and every parent knows how it feels when you lead a child into the first day of school, and that looked to giv
-pupil funding. now these politicians say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. >>> attention san francisco shoppers, bring your own bag or it will cost you. starting tomorrow a citywide ordinance banning the use of plastic bags will go into effect for all retail stores. currently the ban only effects large super markets and pharmacies. don't have a bag? well, you will be charged 10 cents for every paper bag that you need. >> i think that we should pay for the damage that we are doing out there in the environment. if we can have the two second thought, i have a bag to reuse and that is great. >> the city will hand out free reusable bags at more than 50 events across the city during october and november. >>> well, just last year there was talk of drastic service cuts, now, cal trains is adding trains to meet demand.
in education of our children 84% of respondents on the survey agreed to this statement. agreed or strongly agreed to this statement. you can clap. [applause] okay. i am coming to my last two slides, so you can have a sigh of relief from numbers and how did sfusd perform compared to other school districts in california and how do you think we did? okay. so as you can see we are -- when we say we're one of the highest performing districts here is the performance of all the other districts. we just took a sample of five others as well as the state so the state is at 57% proficiency and we are at 61%. last year to this year the state moved from 54 to 57 and we moved from 57 to 61. 60.5 percent rounded was 61%. csd map -- again this is grades two through 11. you will see that the state is at 52%. we're at 57% proficiency. their growth was 50 to 52%. ours was 56 to 57%. and with that i am going to turn it back to -- what was the reason? the cause? the validity behind these, the best practices. >> thank you. so in looking how our sites performed overall, our school communities it wa
to education. >> 48.5% of the slot machine proceeds and 15% of the table games revenues go directly into the education trust fund. that trust fund, even though our gaming regimen has only relatively recently started in maryland, over the last few years, i believe it has already jen yate rated in the -- generated in the neighborhood of $100 million for maryland schools. >> the governor said education funding in maryland has more than doubled from $3.9 billion in 2006 to $7.3 billion in next year's budget. >>> the news edge back in d.c. and a familiar scene today as "occupy" d.c. protestors hit the streets on the anniversary of their demonstrations here in the nation's capital. protestors return to rally against what they call corporate greed. dozens of people representing the so-called 99% marched downtown amid all of the chanting and chaos, protestors say they have only grown stronger and more determined. maureen umeh joins us live from northwest with a closer look at the fight. maureen? >> reporter: will, occupy protestors are making their way back here to a project that is being r
of that assessment an educational process of how do we ride bicycles here in san francisco? because it's kind of confusing. >> thank you. >> the next question is for miss breed, mr. davis and miss johnson. a recent civil grand jury report called the san francisco ethics commission essentially a sleeping watchdog. at the request of supervisor campos the city requested a comparison of ethics in san îg:]Ñand los angele identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city,
for education but we can keep it in this country but you still have to go through the process. there's a way of solving this. they key is for republicans and democrats to work together. berkley: there is a way to solve all of these challenges. and my opponent does a good game, the fact of the matter is that he doesn't track is right. is opposed to comprehension immigration reform. he's in favor of the arizona law that most was declared unconstitutional by the united states senate -- by the united states supreme court. my opponent thought the arizona law was so good he wanted to bring a tear to nevada, but the one thing, the one thing that i can't believe he is opposed is the d.r.e.a.m. act. and he voted against it. not 80%, not 20%. he voted against 100% of the. what does the d.r.e.a.m. act said? it says if you're a youngster that has come to the united states through no fault of your own and you're in college or you volunteer for our military, you should have a pass to legal status. it couldn't be any more simple than that, and my opponent voted against it and the also come he's on record s
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for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be reformed or eliminated to help balance the city's bu
, in the education and training of our young people. for we will only fulfil our collective economic potential, if we fulfil our individual human potential. yet the legacy of educational inequality in britain is an economy operating at half power, with far too many young people never getting the qualifications they could get, never doing the jobs they could do, never earning the wages they could earn. the true cost of this cannot be counted in pounds and pence. yes it's a huge drag on our economy, but more than that, it is an affront to natural justice and to everything we liberal democrats stand for. because if you strip away all the outer layers to expose this party's philosophical core, what do you find? an unshakeable belief in freedom. not the tinny sound of the libertarian's freedom -- still less the dead thud of the socialist's -- but the rich sound of liberal freedom, amplified and sustained by the thing that gives it real meaning, opportunity. the freedom to be who you are. [applause] the opportunity to be who you could be. that, in essence, is the liberal promise. and that is why this party
, education, housing, mental health services that will enable individuals to break the -- break free from violence and long-term seminal behavior disrupting the into generational cycle of crime. in response to the mayor's direction to immediately interrupt, we are working very closely with our criminal justice partners. in addition to that, we have opened an office in bayview to bring our staff closer to the population that they are here to serve. [applause] that office opened on august 1. in addition to that, through the support of the mayor and board, we will be completing evidence- based individualize risk and needs assessment of the cases that we are supervising an employee in the use of investment of over $4.7 million in the city's money that they have invested in the employment education, mental health, housing, and treatment. we have also created specialized caseloads for those high-risk transitional-age youth, including gender-responsive caseloads so we can meet the needs of our young men and women. in addition to that, we have an enhanced collaboration as a member of the gang tas
'll be waiting by the door if anyone wants information and websites to go to educate yourselves better about this. one more comment which is that natural family planning can be used 99% effectiveness, significantly greater than a lot of the contraceptives that -- >> thank you. >> have you looked at the population in south america recently? [laughter] no, let me answer this. i think that -- >> [inaudible] >> i believe what you said is valid. i really -- when i teach constitutional law and i deal with the issue offed sodomy and the laws against it in the united states, i ask the students why was it banned? okay? it's not just -- sodomy applies to both homo sexual intercourse, and i asked why was it banned in the united states? it was a dearly held belief, in which i share, which is when people get together to express love through sexuality, it should be an expression of love and not just the need to have a physical release because when -- we're using another human being for our own pleasure. i find that immoral, all right? however, it is absolutely true that what you're talking about does -- is not
for more investment in education and health care in myanmar. obama administration is expected to seek congressional approval to ease sanction while also monitoring the progress of myanmar's democratic reforms. myanmar is home to 60 million people and rich in natural resources. its strategic location in asia gives it the potential to become a trading hub. they need foreign capitals to help support. western trade restrictions have started to increase myanmar's dependence on economic aid from china. with sanctions being eased, the united states now has a chance to enhance its own economic relationship with myanmar. and also counter the spreading influence of china. nhk world. >>> young indonesians crossing the seas have flocked to a college fair in jakarta. about 2,000 students attended japan's event. representatives from 50 universities set up stalls. students crowded around stands from big players. >> translator: i've always enjoyed learning japanese. i want to become a translator. >> translator: i think that the fair is a good opportunity for universities in japan. because they have a
we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. . >>> a campaign with a powerful message to fight breast cancer. 30 people took part in the immediate impact breast cancer walk. the idea began as a response to the controversy over the komen race for the cure. they decided to fund raise for local groups. they raised $93,000. >>> more than 30 million americans suffer from migraine headaches and a third of them standard treatment doesn't help and now one doctor is offering a new report. how his patients swear by it. >> reporter: she loves to spend time with her kids. on this day reading. >> he was sent to bed without eating anything. >> you wouldn't do that, would you? >> no. >>> for years it was no laughing matter. intinsely, painful chronic headaches -- intensely, pain full chronic headaches. >> i would tr
is happening. also a reflection of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much a
'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number.
have an aging population, but they also have huge problems with their youth, the pressures on education, health and so on for young people. this is a major challenge for the developing countries. some of them have begun to address it. this is one of those issues that creeps up on you, like climate change. government pushes it into the next session of parliament, if you like, but by 26 feet there will be more people over the age of 60 than under the age of 16. in bolivia they now have an old age pension of about $50 per month, per person, which is beginning to improve matters. >> there are other kinds of things that these producers are talking about. >> it really affects every area of social policy. it is about health, it is about housing and long-term educating people to make themselves healthier so that they do not represent a drain on the state as they get older. it is about the opportunities and challenges. older people, with their experience and education, if they live longer and work longer, they can contribute. >> does your report give any sense as to what might happen if these me
. >> that is not a solution that is a real solution that will improve students' education. my concern is that a lot of democrats are going along with it and you'll pass policies that support this. >> cenk: she's exactly right. now why do those high-level democrats go along with it? it might have something to do with the money la bow ski. rahm emmanuel got $12 million from anti-union charter school advocates. and it's all about the money. whether they're republicans or democrats that are selling out to that money. now maggie gyllenhaal, who is a real progressive, tries to defend the movie when she's talking about it. >> it's okay to find fault inside of an constitution that you--inside of an institution that you ultimately believe in. i think there are problems in the teachers' union because ultimately the adults in this situation are not agreeing to the point this we're not able to make the changes we need to make in order to serve our kids, we're all failing into i'm sure she means well, but maggie, you got it all wrong. here is reason why they go after the teachers' union. there is only one group
education director for credit dot com. thank you for joining us. how widespread is it? how often does it happen that your credit score as the consumer is different than a score your lender is looking at? >> well, almost 100 percent of the time because typically consumers do not get this course that lenders are using, unless they have already applied for credit and been turned down or charge more for credit, then a disclosure is required, but what most of us are doing is going online, getting an education credit score which can be helpful but is not necessarily the same score the lender is using. lori: so why should i spend a right to purchase by credit score if it is now with the lenders getting anywhere? >> it's a great question. of course we give a free credit score. we know what you spend that money. i think what consumers need to look at is, what is the information telling me about my credit worthiness. what can i improve and what can to improve? you can avenges court. lori: and as to what your saying, but i just want to give money. i want to borrow money. a fire and turned them t
was a leader in education funding. erika derry: and the fact that california isn't making it a priority frustrates me. dan hurd: i'm ashamed of that, and i don't want this to continue for my daughter. brenda kealing: prop 38 is going to bring a lot of money to our schools. suzan solomon: the money stays at the school site. cade derry: what i would really like to see is that the teachers... that were laid off come back to the school. navaz hurd: a smaller class size. navaz hurd: as a mom i want that. as a teacher i want that. prop 38 is an opportunity of a generation. both: we're the fruit guys! back in 1998, we had this idea to deliver fresh fruit to offices in downtown san francisco. we built these wooden crates, filled these with fruit in my one-bedroom apartment. the fruit guys has been with bank of america since they first started. we work with them to help them grow and succeed. we're coming up on 50 employees and delivering to thousands of companies every week. i would definitely say this is a fruitful business. >>> the power of nature is on display when winds from a typhoon pick
. so we have to get services in there. we have to get education so that we can begin to link the services and begin to intervene as quickly as possible. and when we come back we're going to be talking a little bit more about the dynamics of a family that faces substance and mental disorders. we'll be right back. [music playing] when a family member has a substance abuse or mental disorder, it has a profound impact on the family unit. whether it is the young person who's having an issue and its impact on the siblings and on the parents and their time and effort, their ability to get treatment and help that individual recover. but it's also what happens when a young person has a parent or an adult in their life who is struggling with addiction or who has a mental disorder. so helping the family unit deal with what's going on in the family, as opposed to dealing with just the individual who's having the illness or the addiction, is really critical. when the family discovers that a family member has a mental health problem or a substance use problem, the response of the family de
educated on vaccines. he vetoed legislation allowing them to interview specific celebrity convicts and a bill that would have given over time and meal breaks to domestic workers. >>> tomorrow is the supreme court's first day of the new term. six of the nine justices went to church to receive the traditional blessings on the court. one major case that is expected to be heard is california's proposition 8 the ban on same-sex marriage. it could be heard sometime in november. >>> oracle world in san francisco kicked off with a keynote address from larry ella son. he announced some major new products. lilian kim is live at the mosconi center with more on that. lilian? >> alan, this is where it is all happening. we are at the mosconi center where they wanted to know what larry ella son had to offer. >> he took to the stage before a packed room of 10,000 people. on this opening night he kicked off the event with several big product announcements including the unveiling of the oracle data base 12c. >> be my guest. it is the first multi tenant database in the world. >> it has been in develo
who don't want their kids immunized to sign a waiver indicating they have beg educated on vaccines. he vetoed legislation allowing them to interview specific celebrity convicts and a bill that would have given over time and meal breaks to domestic workers. >>> tomorrow is the supreme court's first day of the new term. six of the nine justices went to church to receive the traditional blessings on the court. one major case that is expected to be heard is california's proposition 8 the ban on same-sex marriage. it could be heard sometime in november. >>> oracle world world in san francisco kicked off with a keynote address from larry ella son. he announced some major new products. lilian kim is live at the mosconi center with more on that. lilian? >> alan, this is where it is all happening. we are at the mosconi center where they wanted to know what larry ella son had to offer. >> he took to the stage before a packed room of 10,000 people. on this opening night he kicked off the event with several big product announcements including the thea base 12c. >> be my guest. it is the first mult
. that is 100% incorrect. people need to educate themselves on how congress works. he had 60 votes until august when tent kennedy died. -- ted kennedy. then he had 59. a special election seat was triggered, the election with scott brown, that gave the republicans 41. then we lost senator byrd. that was another vote that we lost. so the president only had a senate for about eight months. in that eight months he was dealing with the worst recession since the great depression. so people need to educate themselves and stop going with these party lines of the democrats controlled congress two years and so on. there's only so much you can do. host: thanks for calling. this on twitter -- on facebook -- gary johnson will be on this program to take your calls in about an hour, 8:30 eastern time. the last call from texas reminds us of the interview with ross belprospero. -- with ross perot. richard spoke with him down in plano, texas. the headline, the u.s. is headed for disaster. the full interview with richard wolfe of "usa today" talking with perot, 9:00 p.m. eastern time. [video clip] >> do you think
preschool education. everybody looked the same. everybody acted the same. everybody was expected to learn in the same way. woman: go, guys, go! hendrick: but times have changed. now we live in a diverse, multicultural, multiethnic world. and as teachers, we have a tremendous responsibility to not only teach multiculturally but, whenever we can, to practice it in our own classroom. i'm joanne hendrick, author of the whole child and your guide to this video series. in this program, we're going to look at the ways in which we can help by providing, when we can, multicultural and non-sexist education for the children in our care. we'll see children and teachers in action from a number of early childhood programs, family daycare homes, head start, university-based schools, and private infant centers and preschools. we'll hear teachers discuss some of the typical problems they face and their solutions when trying to create a respectful, open environment for all their children and families. children like to feel good about themselves. they enjoy the feeling of not only knowing who they are but a
nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and i
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